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beamwidth2gain

Compute antenna gain from azimuth and elevation beamwidths

Description

example

g = beamwidth2gain(hpbw) returns the gain of an antenna given its half-power beamwidth, hpbw.

g = beamwidth2gain(hpbw,at) also specifies the type of antenna aperture.

Examples

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Compute the antenna gain for a uniformly illuminated rectangular aperture. Specify an azimuth beamwidth of 1.4 degrees and an elevation beamwidth of 5 degrees.

BWaz = 1.4;
BWel = 5;

g = beamwidth2gain([BWaz;BWel],'UniformRectangular')
g = 36.6522

Input Arguments

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Antenna half-power beamwidth in degrees, specified as a row vector or a two-row matrix.

  • If hpbw is a row vector, then beamwidth2gain assumes a symmetric aperture and each element of hpbw specifies the same beamwidth for both azimuth and elevation dimensions.

  • If hpbw is a two-row matrix, then its first row contains azimuth beamwidth values and its second row contains elevation beamwidth values.

Data Types: double | single

Antenna aperture type, specified as one of these:

  • 'IdealRectangular' — Rectangular beam with no sidelobes

  • 'IdealElliptical' — Elliptical beam with no sidelobes

  • 'IdealGaussian' — Gaussian beam with no sidelobes

  • 'UniformRectangular' — Uniformly illuminated rectangular aperture

  • 'CosineRectangular' — Cosine illuminated rectangular aperture

  • 'UniformCircular' — Uniformly illuminated circular aperture. In this case, hpbw must be either a row vector or a two-row matrix with identical rows because the beamwidth is the same in the azimuth and elevation dimensions.

  • 'ParabolicCircular' — Circular aperture parabolic-on-a-12 dB pedestal distribution. In this case, hpbw must be either a row vector or a two-row matrix with identical rows because the beamwidth is the same in the azimuth and elevation dimensions.

  • 'PracticalGeneral' — General-use practical antenna with sidelobes and null fill. For more details, see [1].

Data Types: char | string

Output Arguments

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Antenna gain in dBi units, returned as a vector. The number of elements of g equals the number of columns of hpbw.

References

[1] Stutzman, Warren L., and Gary A. Thiele. Antenna Theory and Design. 3rd ed. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley, 2013.

[2] Stutzman, Warren L. “Estimating Directivity and Gain of Antennas.” IEEE Antennas and Propagation Magazine 40, no. 4 (August 1998): 7–11. https://doi.org/10.1109/74.730532.

Extended Capabilities

C/C++ Code Generation
Generate C and C++ code using MATLAB® Coder™.

Introduced in R2021a