Bootstrapping from Inverted Market Curves

The following two examples demonstrate the behavior of bootstrapping with inverted CDS market curves, that is, market quotes with higher spreads for short-term CDS contracts. The first example is handled normally by cdsbootstrap:

Settle = '17-Jul-2009';  % valuation date for the CDS
MarketDates = datenum({'20-Sep-10','20-Sep-11','20-Sep-12','20-Sep-14',...
'20-Sep-16'});

ZeroDates = datenum({'17-Jan-10','17-Jul-10','17-Jul-11','17-Jul-12',...
'17-Jul-13','17-Jul-14'});
ZeroRates = [1.35 1.43 1.9 2.47 2.936 3.311]'/100;
ZeroData = [ZeroDates ZeroRates];

MarketSpreadsInv1 = [750 650 550 500 450]';
MarketDataInv1 = [MarketDates MarketSpreadsInv1];
[ProbDataInv1,HazDataInv1] = cdsbootstrap(ZeroData,MarketDataInv1,Settle)
ProbDataInv1 =

   1.0e+05 *

    7.3440    0.0000
    7.3477    0.0000
    7.3513    0.0000
    7.3586    0.0000
    7.3659    0.0000


HazDataInv1 =

   1.0e+05 *

    7.3440    0.0000
    7.3477    0.0000
    7.3513    0.0000
    7.3586    0.0000
    7.3659    0.0000

In the second example, cdsbootstrap generates a warning:

MarketSpreadsInv2 = [800 550 400 250 100]';
MarketDataInv2 = [MarketDates MarketSpreadsInv2];

[ProbDataInv2,HazDataInv2] = cdsbootstrap(ZeroData,MarketDataInv2,Settle);
Warning: Found non-monotone default probabilities (negative hazard rates)

A non-monotone bootstrapped probability curve implies negative default probabilities and negative hazard rates for certain time intervals. Extreme market conditions can lead to these types of situations. In these cases, you must assess the reliability and usefulness of the bootstrapped results.

The following plot illustrates these bootstrapped probability curves. The curves are concave, meaning that the marginal default probability decreases with time. This result is consistent with the market information that indicates a higher default risk in the short term. The second bootstrapped curve is non-monotone, as indicated by the warning.

ProbTimes = yearfrac(Settle, MarketDates);
figure
plot([0; ProbTimes],[0; ProbDataInv1(:,2)])
hold on
plot([0; ProbTimes],[0; ProbDataInv2(:,2)],'--')
hold off
grid on
axis([0 ProbTimes(end,1) 0 ProbDataInv1(end,2)])
xlabel('Time (years)')
ylabel('Cumulative Default Probability')
title('Probability Curves for Inverted Spread Curves')
legend('1st instance','2nd instance','location','SouthEast')

The resulting plot

Also in line with the previous plot, the hazard rates for these bootstrapped curves are decreasing because the short-term risk is higher. Some bootstrapped parameters in the second curve are negative, as indicated by the warning.

HazTimes = yearfrac(Settle, MarketDates);
figure
stairs([0; HazTimes(1:end-1,1); HazTimes(end,1)+1],...
   [HazDataInv1(:,2);HazDataInv1(end,2)])
hold on
stairs([0; HazTimes(1:end-1,1); HazTimes(end,1)+1],...
   [HazDataInv2(:,2);HazDataInv2(end,2)],'--')
hold off
grid on
xlabel('Time (years)')
ylabel('Hazard Rate')
title('Hazard Rates for Inverted Spread Curves')
legend('1st instance','2nd instance','location','NorthEast')

The resulting plot shows the hazard rates for both bootstrapped curves:

For further discussion on inverted curves, and their relationship to arbitrage, see O'Kane and Turnbull, 2003 (Credit Derivatives).

See Also

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